Milagres, The Family Crest, Boogarins (from Brazil)

The Satellite presents

Milagres

The Family Crest

Boogarins (from Brazil)

Thu, March 20, 2014

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm (event ends at 2:00 am)

The Satellite

Los Angeles, CA

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 21 and over

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Milagres
Milagres
Audible fireworks explode in the distance of the opening moments of Milagres second album, the aptly titled, Violent Light. It is essentially elemental, as vocalist Kyle Wilson descends on lead track, "Perennial Bulb", singing, "I am in a cloud", keys and drums pounding around him as he issues the album's thesis statement: "My feet are bare. They hit the ground. I'm running toward the miracle." This is the way down and the way up for the band, fire exploding in the sky behind them, toes tucked firmly into the dark soil, running toward a transfiguration. Far from being the fleeting perennial bulb or mercurial firework, Milagres instead fill Violent Light with richness and delicacy, channeling influences as diverse as Bowie, Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush, providing a durability of vision and influence that is as much born from the earth as it seeks to return to it.

The history of Milagres runs back more than a decade as Wilson performed under the name as a solo artist before moving to Brooklyn and eventually linking with current members Fraser McCulloch, Chris Brazee and new drummer, Paul Payabyab. In 2011, official debut Milagres record, Glowing Mouth, yielded a sight-unseen signing to Kill Rock Stars, national club and European festival touring, and inclusion on numerous year-end "Best of" lists for 2011 and 2012. Eponymous single, "Glowing Mouth" introduced audiences to Wilson's brilliant falsetto hooks, as well as the band's blinking, cold-medicine aesthetic. It was a fever dream, a fantasy world full of pitch and yaw, blurry edges and limitless possibility, choruses that erupted and hooks that stuck. Independent rock fans and press took note, as well as radio outlets KEXP and KCRW. Returning to the studio with McCulloch on production duties, Wilson and the band set out to expand and clarify the warm neon universe of Glowing Mouth.

Violent Light begins at the beginning. Wilson found inspiration for the record in the memories of childhood summers spent with his grandparents in Northern New Mexico. The caves, valleys and mesa burial grounds of the Pueblo Indians intermingled with Wilson's conversations about atomic physics with his grandfather, a scientist on the Manhattan Project of the 1940s and the development of the hydrogen bomb in the 1950s. This mixture of twin organic compounds, the history of ancient people who made their lives in these caves in the earth and the lethal, brilliant modernity of the mid-20th century, unite and blur on Violent Light. When the recording for the album was complete, Wilson returned to visit his grandfather, an attempt to unify these visions, the scientist and the outdoorsmen poet. The conversation bore no fruit, and the listener is left only with the brilliant tension between these twin naturalisms on Violent Light. The stakes aren't life and death, but how best to live in the shadow of modern fatalism, to wrestle with the meaning of the fire in the sky.

The album ranges across eras and soundscapes channeling psychedelica, dream pop and classic rock. Lead single, "Jeweled Cave" rides a winking Bowie hook, surging keyboard and syrupy backing vocals. Wilson insists in the tracer fire of the chorus, "We were in love" as the arrangement swirls around him. The stakes are in the sky on "Black Table" as Paul Payabyab's insistent drumming backs an arrangement that easily could fit in the Peter Gabriel catalogue. Stand-out "Terrifying Sea" swells with immediacy, Wilson again drifting through a dangerous and elemental geography before pleading for connection, "I want nothing but you touching me." Perhaps this is the "core of light" that Chris Brazee describes as lying at the center of these dark compositions. Even the bright, synthesizer-driven, "Sunburn" has Wilson wrestling between the earthly and the modern, "You felt real in a world of plastic, a bit of grit in a sterile place, I'll be the bird flying up into the sunburn", another of the album's instantly memorable hooks. It is the Icarus problem, to have flown so high and burned our little wax wings: The caves of the Pueblo Indians dug into earth of the testing sites for the atomic bomb.

These tensions drive Milagres forward on Violent Light. Melodies and lyrics written partially in wanderings through Greenpoint and Williamsburg day and nightlife, Wilson and the band apply their unique democracy to fleshing out the arrangements that appear on the record. They take the listener into the belly of a remembered landscape, a meditation on the self and modernity as we have come to know and fear it. On final track, "Another Light", Wilson sings, "When I was young I was afraid that I would never find a way home", closing the record with, "I'm not afraid to die a natural death", the final rest in the existential crisis. This is the atomic bomb, the ancient burial site, the melody hiding in the bar at the corner of Franklin and Manhattan Avenues. This, then, is the miracle, the bare feet and explosions of Violent Light, an intimate and ambitious record from a band with its toes on the ground and its eyes in the sky.
The Family Crest
The Family Crest
"While vying to collect more musicians onstage than the Decemberists or Arcade Fire, The Family Crest harbors an affection for Burt Bacharach-style swingin' romanticism that is sure to impress lovers of classical pop. " - The San Francisco Chronicle

"They take their earnest, anthemic cue from Arcade Fire, but the presence of so many string and wind instruments and the talents of frontman Liam McCormick put them on a unique frequency. When, 3 or so songs into their set, they reveal a horn section in the balcony above the dance floor, they pretty much have everyone eating out of their hands." - The Bay Bridged

"The Family Crest have crafted a vibrant collection of stadium-sized anthems and reflective ballads, unified by soaring melodies, lush arrangements, and singer/guitarist Liam McCormick's persuasively personal lyricism. Intricately orchestrated songs like North and Got Soul are animated by a dramatic sonic scope, thanks to the ensemble's remarkable communal instrumentation conveying an ardent yearning for emotional release. Such exuberant and evocative music invites a powerful kinship between the band and its audience, a bond which only serves to stir the Bay Area-based collective's creative spirit. Join the family." - Kata Rokkar

"The Family Crest proves that collaboration – and even inclusion of fans in the creative process – stirs creativity and allows for a fruitful blending of sounds… As interesting as the clever incorporation of classical music into modern musical genres (really, you just have to listen to these guys) is the story of how one guy's project to create a unique sound ended up involving hundreds of individuals known as the "Extended Family." By additionally blurring the lines between talent and audience, The Family Crest are a growing force to be reckoned with." - Daily BR!NK

"Their songs can vary quite widely from symphonic, to cabaret, to a flat-out rock and roll ruckus. It is hard to say which place they fall into most often, and given the instrumentation it's easy to think it might be a little too down tempo, but have no doubt when the last note is played it is clear that above all else they are a rock band at heart." - Seismic-Sound
Boogarins (from Brazil)
Fernando Almeida and Benke Ferraz met in high school in the central Brazilian city of Goiânia, far from the thriving cultural metropolises of São Paulo and Rio, yet nevertheless in the shadow of the icons of their homeland's great musical heritage -- not bossa nova and samba, however, but psychedelic pop. Still in their late teens, the music they make together, recorded on borrowed gear and with self-taught technology in their parents' basements, shares the spirit and soul of Tropicalismo, but it has also blossomed in the light of the current international DIY underground. Almeida is the poet and singer, Ferraz is the multi-instrumentalist and gear-head, and together, as Boogarins, they write songs that reach beyond their years and any restrictions of geography or genre: timeless pop untethered from categorizations.

The songs that are collected on As Plantas Que Curam (translated: Plants That Heal) were recorded mostly as a duo, before they ever considered playing live, before they found a rhythm section or even a name -- the Bogarim the band was named for is a jasmine flower the ancients say "smells like pure love" -- and the album speaks with an intimacy and off-kilter fragility that reflects those humble origins. Yet from the exotic psychedelia of "Erre," in which Ferraz's fuzz guitar spirals around Almeida's yearning melodies, to the jangling melancholy of "Doce," there is a sophistication and depth in the songwriting and playing here that shows a rare talent, each track filled with beauty and freewheeling emotion. A snapshot of Boogarins' youthful ambition and dreams, As Plantas Que Curam is a love letter from the green fields of Goiânia to all of us.

As Plantas Que Curam will be released Oct. 1, 2013 on on vinyl, CD, and mp3 by Other Music Recording Co. and on cassette through Burger Records.
Venue Information:
The Satellite
1717 Silverlake Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90027
http://thesatellitela.com/