Harper Simon, The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers, Jerry Borgé, Money Mark, Amy Blaschke, $2 drink specials + free pool from 7-9pm

The Satellite presents

Harper Simon

The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers

Jerry Borgé

Money Mark

Amy Blaschke

$2 drink specials + free pool from 7-9pm

Mon, March 11, 2013

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm (event ends at 2:00 am)

The Satellite

Los Angeles, CA

FREE!

This event is 21 and over

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Harper Simon
Harper Simon
“I see the character in the song ‘Division Street’ as being at a moment where life can go a couple different ways,” says Harper Simon of the title track from his narrative-driven new album. “I think these songs tend to be like a snapshot of a character at a pivotal moment. They could go this way or that way on the metaphorical Division Street: up or down, negative or positive, to the light or to self-destruction.



“Or—like in the song ‘99’— they’re looking back at a moment they didn’t recognize as pivotal,” he says. “Because we rarely do.”

A departure from his self-titled first record, Division Street features a sound that’s much more driven by electric guitars than his alt country-flavored debut. “The mission was to make the kind of Rock ‘n’ Roll record I would want to listen to myself,” he says. “Which sounds simple but is, in fact, incredibly difficult.”


Simon co-produced Division Street with Tom Rothrock, who produced three albums for Elliott Smith (Either/Or, XO and Figure 8) and Beck’s first album Mellow Gold, among others. As the team worked, the album’s sound grew rougher around the edges. “I felt challenged and inspired by the idea of making a modern psychedelic folk-rock album, a Tom Rothrock production like XO, but then the Velvet Underground and the Stones kept entering in,” says Simon. “Elliott Smith was very influenced by the Beatles but my guitar playing is more influenced by Keith Richards. And I kept wanting to emphasize more lo-fi elements.”


The striking characters that appear in the LP’s songs are sometimes amalgamations of people Simon has known, and at other times they’re fictitious—but they’re all at a moment of personal watershed. Asked about the track “Eternal Questions,” Simon says, “Originally I was imagining this character, this guy who is bolting from rehab. And he’s in a car heading back to town. Heading back to get loaded. Because there’s something about that moment that is such a crazy energy I thought it would be interesting for a song. And I thought about him wondering who he was gonna call, what girl’s house he may crash at. What dealer he would call. Knowing he was fucking up but being beyond turning back.”

Simon’s first record featured a whole coterie of collaborators and many of its songs were co-written. The new album, however, features Simon himself more prominently, and is personally riskier for that reason. “I wrote all the music and all the lyrics, and it’s a guitar-driven record and the guitar is played by me. It’s mostly the sound of me and Pete [drummer Pete Thomas, of Elvis Costello and the Attractions] putting it down live, the two of us. Then other players, great ones, came later and overdubbed.”


“Maybe I had a lack of confidence on the first record, so I wanted the involvement of more established writers to set the bar high,” says Simon. “This time, I felt I should carry it all myself.”



Division Street took 18 months to write and record, and finishing it presented some personal challenges. “In the middle of recording, I thought I’d take a few weeks off to work on lyrics, but it turned into three months,” says Simon. “It was a very difficult time. I was suffering from deep depression and I was creeping myself out constantly. I had to go on medication eventually, which helped some. It took me three months to finally return to the studio, but by that time I had most of the lyrics.”



The album was difficult to complete, yes, but that makes some sense: as a listener, Simon is attracted to singer-songwriters whose difficult processes are evident in their work. “I like when a songwriter really goes down the rabbit hole and digs deep to come up with something powerful,” he says. “I tend to be drawn to artists with real problems—misfits and wounded animals.”



Division Street features lots of guest musicians—including Nikolai Fraiture from the Strokes on bass, vocals by Inara George, Feist’s musical director Brian LeBarton playing synths, as well as Nate Walcott from Bright Eyes and Wilco’s Mikael Jorgensen. Later, Benmont Tench (of the Heartbreakers) and celebrated LA-based record producer and composer Jon Brion joined a recording session. “I’m very lucky,” says Simon. “Everybody that we asked to come and guest on the record showed up.”



Drummer Pete Thomas was deeply involved in the album’s construction, from its earliest sessions. “I had the perfect drummer for the job in Pete Thomas,” says Simon. “I’d grown up listening to his work with Elvis Costello. Pete is very unique, I think—he has the sophistication of a first-rate session drummer, if needed, but he also has an understanding of primitive, punk drumming. And even this description of him does not do justice to his musicality.”



“I admit to having gotten a late start,” says Simon, who hopes to follow up Division Street with two more albums in quick succession. “Most people do their Rock ‘n’ Roll stuff from 25 to 35; I’m going to do it from 35 to 45. For some reason, that’s my weird fate.”



Simon’s tastes are eclectic, which might explain why this album has such a different sound from his first. “As a guitar player, I’m just as comfortable playing honky tonk or fingerpicking folk-y stuff as I am playing a Ramones riff or a Ron Asheton style solo,” he says. “I like Little Richard, the Kinks, Big Star, Hank Williams and the Pixies and Television and Muddy Waters and T Rex. I like the Who and I like X. I like it all.”
The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers
The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers
The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers began as a collective of friends getting together in the summer of 2010. A choir of up to 15 revived the old gospel spirit with songs like “I Shall Not Be Moved”, “12 Gates”, and “In My Time of Dying”. Slowly they evolved to a band of 9, committed to keeping the spirit of gospel music alive. Influenced by both past gospel musicians such as The Dixie Hummingbirds, Washington Phillips and Sister Rosetta Tharpe as well as current bands like The Black Keys, Wilco, and Calexico, the band is creating a unique style of blues, indie rock, folk, and bluegrass. Some of the band’s favorite things include banjos, kickdrums, hand clappin’, foot stompin’, and sing-alongs.
The band has released two EP’s produced by Matt Wignall (Cold War Kids, J. Roddy Walston and the Business, The Fling) with songs that “pulse with the energy of the pre-rock ‘n’ roll era, when gospel greats raised their voices to the sky” (Buzzbands LA). Both EP’s can be found at eaglerockgospelsingers.bandcamp.com.
Jerry Borgé
Jerry Borgé
Jerry Borgé is the rock and roll voice of Jason Borger, session keyboardist and arranger (Jackson Browne, Jonathan Wilson, The Vines, American Music Club, Chuck Prophet, Robert Francis and many more!) Old soul crooner, punk rock guitarist. He's the Rat Pack's Vegas AND Miami Beach; he's Gainsbourg's Paris, maneuvering a Vespa through the cobblestone streets with a baguette in his bag. A Mr. Excitement for an all too reserved generation, he's writing big pop hooks and infusing the spaces between them with more hooks that pummel the listener till they're down for the count, face pressed against the mat, hearing the referee's voice count to 10 in an echo soaked miasma. It's just like that time of evening when you crack open your first beer; it's the anticipation of a night to remember. The hope of spring and the crack of the bat; the melancholy of autumn with the leaves turning and the air cooling...in other words, it's Jerry time.
Money Mark
Money Mark
Just about anyone and their mother could earn props from being associated with the Beastie Boys. But in the case of Money Mark, such accolades are most deserved. Often known as "the fourth Beastie," the keyboardist helped push the sound of the bratty rap trio toward its more funky jazz ways in the early '90s. Since then, Mark has parlayed the notoriety into a budding solo career that suggests he is a visionary in his own right as much as he is a way-cool sideman.

Born Mark Ramos-Nishita to a Japanese-Hawaiian father and a Chicano mother in Detroit, Mark was raised in Los Angeles, and it was there that he hooked up with a pre-household-name Dust Brothers to play the keys on several of their Delicious Vinyl projects. But it took his handyman skills and a fair bit of kismet to actually elevate Mark's career to the next level--he was hired to repair a gate at the Beasties' Silver Lake, Calif. enclave. Soon, Mark was a member of the so-called Grand Royal Posse and adding his organ swirl 'n' grooves to much of the Beasties' Check Your Head. He has been on every ensuing release by that band, and is often an integral part of the live show. He also extended his gun-for-hire status by working on efforts by the Wallflowers, Ben Lee, and Mary Lou Lord, among others.

Mark stepped out into the realm of solo artist with Mark's Keyboard Repair, a loopy, retro-ish beatscape that was essentially a repackaging of his previous home-studio noodlings. Originally issued in 1995 as a set of three 10-inch slabs on the very-indie Love Kit label, Repair was reissued later that year on the British trip-jazz imprint Mo' Wax. But it wasn't until 1998's Push The Button that the range of Mark's vision was more fully demonstrated. Here was an album nearly as expansive as the Beasties' own kitchen sink-styled work--a sprawling, playful collection of trip-hop, electronica, tabla grooves, lo-fi soul, cheesemoid lounge jazz, and, maybe most surprisingly, indie-pop. Suddenly, the fourth Beastie got to call as his own an eensy bit of the postmodern pop turf.

This Biography was written by Neal Weiss
Amy Blaschke
Amy Blaschke
The allure of Amy Blaschke’s Americana is in the details — her fragile voice at once exuding strength and vulnerability, lyrical moments that work like weathered photographs, spare arrangements that let her songs breathe. Blaschke, a Seattle native who last released an album in 2007 (under the name Night Canopy), returns this month with “Desert Varnish,” recorded two years ago with collaborators Joshua Grange (guitar), Jebin Bruni (keyboards), Ian Walker (bass) and Steve Nistor (drums), all of whom boast impressive resumés, none of which stand in the way of Blaschke’s unspoken mantra that frequently understatement is the strongest statement of all. The album is out Feb. 19 via Bird on a Lyre Records.
Venue Information:
The Satellite
1717 Silverlake Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90027
http://thesatellitela.com/