Joan of Arc, Magas, Jimmy Whispers

The Satellite Presents

Joan of Arc

Magas

Jimmy Whispers

Thu, February 9, 2017 - Fri, February 10, 2017

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The Satellite

Los Angeles, CA

$12.00

This event is 21 and over

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Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
Twenty years now there’s been this thing, our band, Joan of Arc. Sometimes we forget about it and let it fizzle out for a year while we tend to our lives. Sometimes we cling to it for a year and wake up surprised and exhausted every day for months on end, given walking tours of old Italian towns, browsing dreary British pedestrian malls or barefooted organic grocers on the Pacific coast. We know how lucky we are.

The less we feel like a band—the more we can continue to be a band, but escape that feeling of doing all those shitty, corny things expected of bands—the truer to ourselves we feel. And you all know it, everyone knows it even if everyone has to bury it to get on with their day-to-day: the truer to ourselves we feel, the better everything gets. We have shifted shapes and modified our approaches quite a number of times in the course of twenty years. And we’ve done so always aiming to stay true to ourselves at that moment, by instinct and with conscious intent. This time, it took us a long time to figure out how to start back up. We threw away a lot of songs and started over, over and over.

But here’s the thing: We are getting better at being ourselves. So many of the postures of youth just fall away with time. Most bands break up by that point, or become caricatures of their younger selves. Because money is tricky, or I should say, it comes to be that energy is tricky to muster after all of it goes into the basics of sustaining yourself.

Every day, at some point, it occurs to me that Richard Brautigan killed himself at the age that I am now. But I got this community of weirdo collaborators to lean on that he never had.

We’ve never had an audience that gets any validation of its coolness through liking us. We’ve mangled, juxtaposed, and collaged too many elements for that social contract. But we trust each other.

This time, finally, we trusted each other enough to throw all the songs away, to even throw away every preconceived idea about which one of us should take position at which instrument. We hit Record and played, and our collective tastes emerged. And they, our tastes in the moment, were the only standards in all the expanse of the stupefying and beautiful unknown universe, that we regarded as relevant in the least.

- Tim Kinsella
Magas
Magas
MAGAS (aka James Marlon Magas) has been creating unconventional music since 1992, with avant rock bands COUCH and LAKE OF DRACULA, and since 1999, as solo electronic artist, MAGAS.

In the late '90s, Magas became very interested in electronic dance music and set out to create his own. Humble beginnings with an MC-505 Groovebox attracted the attention of Detroit's ADULT., who gave Magas a crash course in analog production, as well as releasing his Bad Blood (2002) and Friends Forever (2003), on their Ersatz Audio imprint.

Magas soon began touring North America and Europe and becoming known for wild, energetic performances. He gradually expanded his own studio and began producing his own work, as well working on remixes for other artists. His sound gradually became heavier and wilder, culminating in May I Meet My Accuser (2006, Wwilko Records) and Violent ARP (2009, Punch Records). Magas also busied himself with family life, playing with the short-lived Violent ARP Band and remixing other artists.

Over the past couple of years, Magas has shifted focus from performance to production, favoring an instrumental, semi-improvised direction over vocal-based theatrics. Several productions are in the can and will be announced when the time comes. Later this month, February 2013, Notes and Bolts will release the Magas cassette entitled 'Pspoilers'.
Jimmy Whispers
Jimmy Whispers
Former Light Pollution main man James Cicero has hit upon something special with his new solo project, Jimmy Whispers. He sings sincere songs about love and loss with just a chintzy organ recorded straight to an iPhone, and what the music lacks in fidelity it more than makes up for in unself-conscious heart, blissful melodies, and enchanting hooks. He's finished an album, but you can't get it just yet—a proper release is in the works. Cicero plays out often enough, though, that the tunes will stick with you till his next show—and you can still walk away with a copy of his Summer in Pain zine. It builds on themes that also turn up in his music, in his stage banter, and in the crude "Summer in Pain" street art he's plastered around town: there's a collage about Chicago's gun violence, a letter to a woman selling a wedding gown via a flyer, doodles of sharks, non sequiturs about finding inspiration in sadness, and an image that superimposes Cicero on a photo of Phil Jackson, Michael Jordan, and Scottie Pippen. Summer in Pain is pretty scatterbrained and not always easy to understand, but it feels entirely earnest—which makes it a great companion to Cicero's songs.
Venue Information:
The Satellite
1717 Silverlake Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90027
http://thesatellitela.com/